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age quotes

I intend to live forever, or die trying.
Groucho Marx
Few women admit their age. Few men act theirs.
Author Unknown

Youth is wasted on the young.
George Bernard Shaw

Youth would be an ideal state if it came a little later in life.
Herbert Asquith

I recently turned 60. Practically a third of my life is over.
Woody Allen

Life begins at forty - but so do fallen arches, rheumatism, faulty eyesight, and the tendency to tell a story to the same person three or four times.
Helen Rowland

Old age isn't so bad when you consider the alternative.
Maurice Chevalier

Old age is no place for sissies.
Bette Davis

People ask me what I'd most appreciate getting for my eighty-seventh birthday. I'll tell you: a paternity suit.
George Burns

There's one more terrifying fact about old people: I'm going to be one soon.
P. J. O'Rourke

You can live to be a hundred if you give up all the things that make you want to live to be a hundred.
Woody Allen

I'm 74 years old and even though I may be a bit of a rascal ... 33 girls in two months seems to me too much even for a 30-year-old.
Silvio Berlusconi
Italian prime minister, on vice charges allegations.

The old believe everything, the middle-aged suspect everything, the young know everything.
Oscar Wilde

The hardest years in life are those between 10 and 70.
Helen Hayes - at 73

The three ages of man: youth, middle age, and 'my word you do look well.'
June Whitfield

Age is an issue of mind over matter. If you don't mind, it doesn't matter.
Mark Twain

Old age is like a plane flying through a storm. Once you're aboard, there's nothing you can do.
Golda Meir

You want to look younger? Rent smaller children.
Phyllis Diller

Thirty-five is a very attractive age. London society is full of women of the very highest birth who have, of their own free choice, remained thirty-five for years.
Oscar Wilde
The Importance of Being Earnest.

At twenty years of age, the will reigns; at thirty, the wit; and at forty, the judgment.
Benjamin Franklin
Poor Richard's Almanack.

Youth is something very new: twenty years ago no one mentioned it.
Coco Chanel

Allow me to put the record straight. I am forty-six and have been for some years past.
Erica Jong

As Groucho Marx once said, 'Anyone can get old - all you have to do is to live long enough.'
Queen Elizabeth II
At a lunch to celebrate her official 80th birthday.

If I'd known I was gonna live this long, I'd have taken better care of myself.
Eubie Blake - on reaching age of 100

Youth is a disease from which we all recover.
Dorothy Fulheim

At my age flowers scare me.
George Burns

I don't know how you feel about old age, but in my case I didn't even see it coming. It hit me in the rear.
Phyllis Diller

You're never too old to become younger.
Mae West

One should never trust a woman who tells one her real age. A woman who would tell one that, would tell one anything.
Oscar Wilde
A Woman of No Importance.

There are no old people nowadays; they are either 'wonderful for their age' or dead.
Mary Pettibone Poole

It is sad to grow old but nice to ripen.
Brigitte Bardot

I'm very pleased to be here. Let's face it, at my age I'm very pleased to be anywhere.
George Burns

I don't feel old - I don't feel anything until noon. Then it's time for my nap.
Bob Hope

You know you're old if they have discontinued your blood type.
Phyllis Diller

I still think of myself as I was 25 years ago. Then I look in a mirror and see an old bastard and realize it's me.
Dave Allen

Youth, which is forgiven everything, forgives itself nothing: age, which forgives itself everything, is forgiven nothing.
George Bernard Shaw
Man and Superman.

As I grow older and older
And totter towards the tomb
I find that I care less and less
Who goes to bed with whom.
Dorothy L. Sayers

When the age is in the wit is out.
William Shakespeare
Much Ado About Nothing.

No man is ever old enough to know better.
Holbrook Jackson

My mother always used to say, 'The older you get, the better you get, unless you're a banana'.
Betty White - as Rose Nylund in The Golden Girls

We don't stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing.
George Bernard Shaw

We are always the same age inside.
Gertrude Stein

architecture quotes

A man of eighty has outlived probably three new schools of painting, two of architecture and poetry and a hundred in dress.
Lord Byron 

After about the first Millennium, Italy was the cradle of Romanesque architecture, which spread throughout Europe, much of it extending the structural daring with minimal visual elaboration.
Harry Seidler 

After World War II great strides were made in modern Japanese architecture, not only in advanced technology, allowing earthquake resistant tall buildings, but expressing and infusing characteristics of traditional Japanese architecture in modern buildings.
Harry Seidler 

All architecture is great architecture after sunset; perhaps architecture is really a nocturnal art, like the art of fireworks.
Gilbert K. Chesterton 

All architecture is shelter, all great architecture is the design of space that contains, cuddles, exalts, or stimulates the persons in that space.
Philip Johnson 

All real education is the architecture of the soul.
William Bennett 

All the revision in the world will not save a bad first draft: for the architecture of the thing comes, or fails to come, in the first conception, and revision only affects the detail and ornament, alas!
T. E. Lawrence 

An important work of architecture will create polemics.
Richard Meier 

And when an architect has designed a house with large windows, which is a necessity today in order to pull the daylight into these very deep houses, then curtains come to play a big role in architecture.
Arne Jacobsen 

Any architectural project we do takes at least four or five years, so increasingly there is a discrepancy between the acceleration of culture and the continuing slowness of architecture.
Rem Koolhaas 

Any work of architecture that has with it some discussion, some polemic, I think is good. It shows that people are interested, people are involved.
Richard Meier 

Architecture aims at Eternity.
Christopher Wren 

Architecture arouses sentiments in man. The architect's task therefore, is to make those sentiments more precise.
Adolf Loos 

Architecture begins where engineering ends.
Walter Gropius 

Architecture can't fully represent the chaos and turmoil that are part of the human personality, but you need to put some of that turmoil into the architecture, or it isn't real.
Frank Stella 

Architecture doesn't come from theory. You don't think your way through a building.
Arthur Erickson 

Architecture has recorded the great ideas of the human race. Not only every religious symbol, but every human thought has its page in that vast book.
Victor Hugo 

Architecture in general is frozen music.
Friedrich von Schelling 

Architecture is a art when one consciously or unconsciously creates aesthetic emotion in the atmosphere and when this environment produces well being.
Luis Barragan 

Architecture is a science arising out of many other sciences, and adorned with much and varied learning; by the help of which a judgment is formed of those works which are the result of other arts.
Marcus V. Pollio 

writing / writers quotes

Albert Camus:

The purpose of a writer is to keep civilization from destroying itself.

Aldous Huxley:

The author of the Iliad is either Homer or, if not Homer, somebody else of the same name.

Aldous Huxley:

A bad book is as much of a labour to write as a good one; it comes as sincerely from the author's soul.

Alice Walker:

Deliver me from writers who say the way they live doesn't matter. I'm not sure a bad person can write a good book, If art doesn't make us better, then what on earth is it for.

Alice Walker:

Deliver me from writers who say the way they live doesn't matter. I'm not sure a bad person can write a good book. If art doesn't make us better, then what on earth is it for.

Blaise Pascal:

Even those who write against fame wish for the fame of having written well, and those who read their works desire the fame of having read them.

David Ben Gurion:

Anyone who believes you can't change history has never tried to write his memoirs.

Denise Levertov:

One of the obligations of the writer is to say or sing all that he or she can, to deal with as much of the world as becomes possible to him or her in language.

E. B. White:

English usage is sometimes more than mere taste, judgment and education -- sometimes it's sheer luck, like getting across the street.

Elizabeth Drew:

The test of literature is, I suppose, whether we ourselves live more intensely for the reading of it.

F. Scott Fitzgerald:

There was never a good biography of a good novelist. There couldn't be. He is too many people if he's any good.

Flannery O'Conner:

Everywhere I go I'm asked if I think the university stifles writers. My opinion is that they don't stifle enough of them. There's many a best-seller that could have been prevented by a good teacher.

Flannery O'Connor:

Everywhere I go, I'm asked if the universities stifle writers. My opinion is that they don't stifle enough of them.

Frances Hodgson Burnett:

I am writing in the garden. To write as one should of a garden one must write not outside it or merely somewhere near it, but in the garden.

Gloria Steinem:

Writing is the only thing that, when I do it, I don't feel I should be doing something else.

Gracián:

Good things, when short, are twice as good.

Harvey Cox:

All human beings have an innate need to hear and tell stories and to have a story to live by ... religion, whatever else it has done, has provided one of the main ways of meeting this abiding need.
The Seduction of the Spirit, 1973


Isaac Asimov:

If my doctor told me I had only six minutes to live, I wouldn't brood. I'd type a little faster.

Jack Lynch:

Arguments over grammar and style are often as fierce as those over IBM versus Mac, and as fruitless as Coke versus Pepsi and boxers versus briefs.

Jessamyn West:

Writing is a solitary occupation. Family, friends, and society are the natural enemies of the writer. He must be alone, uninterrupted, and slightly savage if he is to sustain and complete an undertaking.

Kathryn Hughes:

Women do not always have to write about women, or gay men about gay men. Indeed, something good and new might happen if they did not.

Lavina Goodell:

Critics are by no means the end of the law. Do not think all is over with you because you articles are rejected. It may be that the editor has his drawer full, or that he does not know enough to appreciate you, or you have not gained a reputation, or he is not in a mood to be pleased. A critic's judgment is like that of any intelligent person. If he has experience, he is capable of judging whether a book will sell. That is all. junior editor, Harper's Bazaar, 1866

Lillian Hellman:

If I had to give young writers advice, I would say don't listen to writers talking about writing or themselves.

Logan Pearsall Smith:

Yes there is a meaning; at least for me, there is one thing that matters - to set a chime of words tinkling in the minds of a few fastidious people.

Lord Byron:

But words are things, and a small drop of ink,
Falling, like dew, upon a thought, produces
That which makes thousands, perhaps millions, think.

Manuel Puig:

What's better, a poetic intuition or an intellectual work? I think they complement each other.

Manuel Puig:

I allow my intuition to lead my path.

Mark Twain:

There are some books that refuse to be written. They stand their ground year after year and will not be persuaded. It isn't because the book is not there and worth being written -- it is only because the right form of the story does not present itself. There is only one right form for a story and if you fail to find that form the story will not tell itself.

Mark Twain:

I notice that you use plain, simple language, short words and brief sentences. That is the way to write English - it is the modern way and the best way. Stick to it; don't let fluff and flowers and verbosity creep in. When you catch an adjective, kill it. No, I don't mean utterly, but kill most of them - then the rest will be valuable. They weaken when they are close together. They give strength when they are wide apart. An adjective habit, or a wordy, diffuse, flowery habit, once fastened upon a person, is as hard to get rid of as any other vice.

Mark Twain:

To get the right word in the right place is a rare achievement. To condense the diffused light of a page of thought into the luminous flash of a single sentence, is worthy to rank as a prize composition just by itself...Anybody can have ideas--the difficulty is to express them without squandering a quire of paper on an idea that ought to be reduced to one glittering paragraph.

Oscar Wilde:

Anybody can make history. Only a great man can write it.

Pearl S. Buck:

I don't wait for moods. You accomplish nothing if you do that. Your mind must know it has got to get down to work.

Pearl S. Buck:

In a mood of faith and hope my work goes on. A ream of fresh paper lies on my desk waiting for the next book. I am a writer and I take up my pen to write.

Ralph Waldo Emerson:

The reality is more excellent than the report.

Ralph Waldo Emerson:

Put the argument into a concrete shape, into an image, some hard phrase, round and solid as a ball, which they can see and handle and carry home with them, and the cause is half won.

Rita Mae Brown:

Writers will happen in the best of families.

Samuel Taylor Coleridge:

Poetry: the best words in the best order.

Sophocles:

A short saying often contains much wisdom.

Stephen King:

Fiction is the truth inside the lie.

T. S. Eliot:

Some editors are failed writers, but so are most writers.

Thomas Jefferson:

Take care that you never spell a word wrong. Always before you write a word, consider how it is spelled, and, if you do not remember, turn to a dictionary. It produces great praise to a lady to spell well.
to his daughter Martha


Tom Clancy:

The difference between fiction and reality? Fiction has to make sense.

V. S. Naipaul:

I have trusted to my intuition to find the subjects, and I have written intuitively. I have an idea when I start, I have a shape; but I will fully understand what I have written only after some years.

V. S. Naipaul:

I have trusted to intuition. I did it at the beginning. I do it even now. I have no idea how things might turn out, where in my writing I might go next.

Virginia Woolf:

It is worth mentioning, for future reference, that the creative power which bubbles so pleasantly in beginning a new book quiets down after a time, and one goes on more steadily. Doubts creep in. Then one becomes resigned. Determination not to give in, and the sense of an impending shape keep one at it more than anything.

Virginia Woolf:

When, however, one reads of a witch being ducked, of a woman possessed by devils, of a wise woman selling herbs, or even a very remarkable man who had a mother, then I think we are on the track of a lost novelist, a suppressed poet. . . indeed, I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman.

Willa Cather:

Writing ought either to be the manufacture of stories for which there is a market demand -- a business as safe and commendable as making soap or breakfast foods -- or it should be an art, which is always a search for something for which there is no market demand, something new and untried, where the values are intrinsic and have nothing to do with standardized values.

William Wordsworth:

Fill your paper with the breathings of your heart...

Winston Churchill:

History will be kind to me for I intend to write it.

worth quotes

Albert Einstein:

Try not to become a man of success but rather try to become a man of value.

Audrey Hepburn:

People, even more than things, have to be restored, renewed, revived, reclaimed, and redeemed; never throw out anyone.

Blaise Pascal:

We are all something, but none of us are everything.

Felix Adler:

The conception of worth, that each person is an end per se, is not a mere abstraction. Our interest in it is not merely academic. Every outcry against the oppression of some people by other people, or against what is morally hideous is the affirmation of the principle that a human being as such is not to be violated. A human being is not to be handled as a tool but is to be respected and revered.
An Ethical Philosophy of Life


Felix Adler:

The unique personality which is the real life in me, I can not gain unless I search for the real life, the spiritual quality, in others. I am myself spiritually dead unless I reach out to the fine quality dormant in others. For it is only with the god enthroned in the innermost shrine of the other, that the god hidden in me, will consent to appear.
An Ethical Philosophy of Life


Goethe:

Treat people as if they were what they ought to be and you help them to become what they are capable of being.

Izaak Walton:

The person that loses their conscience has nothing left worth keeping.

John Dewey:

The only freedom that is of enduring importance is the freedom of intelligence, that is to say, freedom of observation and of judgment, exercised in behalf of purposes that are intrinsically worth while. The commonest mistake made about freedom is, I think, to identify it with freedom of movement, or, with the external or physical side of activity.

Kathleen Norris:

Over and over again mediocrity is promoted because real worth isn't to be found.

Margaret Laurence:

Know that although in the eternal scheme of things you are small, you are also unique and irreplaceable, as are all your fellow humans everywhere in the world.

Marian Wright Edelman:

No one, Eleanor Roosevelt said, can make you feel inferior without your consent. Never give it.

Martin Luther King, Jr.:

I look forward confidently to the day when all who work for a living will be one with no thought to their separateness as Negroes, Jews, Italians or any other distinctions. This will be the day when we bring into full realization the American dream -- a dream yet unfulfilled. A dream of equality of opportunity, of privilege and property widely distributed; a dream of a land where men will not take necessities from the many to give luxuries to the few; a dream of a land where men will not argue that the color of a man's skin determines the content of his character; a dream of a nation where all our gifts and resources are held not for ourselves alone, but as instruments of service for the rest of humanity; the dream of a country where every man will respect the dignity and worth of the human personality.

Mohandas K. Gandhi:

The dignity of man requires obedience to a higher law, to the strength of the spirit.

Ralph Waldo Emerson:

Conservatism is more candid to behold another's worth; reform more disposed to maintain and increase its own.
The Conservative


Robert Louis Stevenson:

There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, that it behooves all of us not to talk about the rest of us.

Rudyard Kipling:

I always try to believe the best of everybody -- it saves so much trouble.

Sogyal Rinpoche:

...when we finally know we are dying, and all other sentient beings are dying with us, we start to have a burning, almost heartbreaking sense of the fragility and preciousness of each moment and each being, and from this can grow a deep, clear, limitless compassion for all beings.

Virginia Satir:

Feelings of worth can flourish only in an atmosphere where individual differences are appreciated, mistakes are tolerated, communication is open, and rules are flexible -- the kind of atmosphere that is found in a nurturing family.

Virginia Woolf:

Without self-confidence we are as babes in the cradle. And how can we generate this imponderable quality, which is yet so invaluable, most quickly? By thinking that other people are inferior to oneself.

William Ellery Channing:

I have expressed my strong interest in the mass of the people; and this is founded, not on their usefulness to the community, so much as on what they are in themselves.... Indeed every man (sic), in every condition, is great. It is only our own diseased sight which makes him little. A man is great as a man, be he where or what he may. The grandeur of his nature turns to insignificance all outward distinctions.

William Ellery Channing:

I do not look on a human being as a machine, made to be kept in action by a foreign force, to accomplish an unvarying succession of motions, to do a fixed amount of work, and then to fall to pieces at death, but as a being of free spiritual powers; and I place little value on any culture but that which aims to bring out these, and to give them perpetual impulse and expansion.

William Lyon Phelps:

This is the final test of a gentleman: his respect for those who can be of no possible value to him.

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